the next good book

We All Want Impossible Things

By Catherine Newman

9/10
(9/10)

209 pages

What’s it about?

Edi and Ash have been friends since they were kids.  Edi has a husband, a seven-year-old son, and ovarian cancer. When she has exhausted all treatments and is ready for palliative care she ends up in a hospice near her best friend, Ash.  This is Ash’s story.

What did it make me think about?

What a gift hospice is- and Catherine Newman you captured it all so well.

Should I read it?

I loved this book! Ash and Edi (but especially Ash) are messy, and human, and getting through a difficult time as best they can. I have no doubt that some will say the writing is too glib- too funny.  But maybe they haven’t spent enough time in a hospice facility.  “Hospice is just so existentially weird.  It’s like you walk in under a giant banner that says, EVERYONE HERE IS DYING! but then most of the time you’re just making small talk and quesadillas, trying to find something to watch on Netflix, or wondering if there’s any pie left.”  I have been fortunate enough to volunteer with hospice for a long time- and I have laughed almost as much as I have cried- so the humor worked for me.  So many of the scenarios in this book ring true to me.  (my dad was put on a waiting list for hospice…). So yes, I recommend this book highly!  I wish I could hand a copy to every person that helps to make hospice such a warm place to land.

Quote-

“I pull the door closed on my way out.  Everywhere, behind closed doors, people are dying, and people are grieving them.  It’s the most basic fact about human life- tied with birth, I guess- but it’s startling too.  Everyone dies, and yet it’s unendurable.  There is so much love inside of us. How do we become worthy of it?  And, then, where does it go?  A worldwide crescendo of grief, sustained day after day, and only one tiny note of it is mine.”

What’s it about?

Edi and Ash have been friends since they were kids.  Edi has a husband, a seven-year-old son, and ovarian cancer. When she has exhausted all treatments and is ready for palliative care she ends up in a hospice near her best friend, Ash.  This is Ash’s story.

What did it make me think about?

What a gift hospice is- and Catherine Newman you captured it all so well.

Should I read it?

I loved this book! Ash and Edi (but especially Ash) are messy, and human, and getting through a difficult time as best they can. I have no doubt that some will say the writing is too glib- too funny.  But maybe they haven’t spent enough time in a hospice facility.  “Hospice is just so existentially weird.  It’s like you walk in under a giant banner that says, EVERYONE HERE IS DYING! but then most of the time you’re just making small talk and quesadillas, trying to find something to watch on Netflix, or wondering if there’s any pie left.”  I have been fortunate enough to volunteer with hospice for a long time- and I have laughed almost as much as I have cried- so the humor worked for me.  So many of the scenarios in this book ring true to me.  (my dad was put on a waiting list for hospice…). So yes, I recommend this book highly!  I wish I could hand a copy to every person that helps to make hospice such a warm place to land.

Quote-

“I pull the door closed on my way out.  Everywhere, behind closed doors, people are dying, and people are grieving them.  It’s the most basic fact about human life- tied with birth, I guess- but it’s startling too.  Everyone dies, and yet it’s unendurable.  There is so much love inside of us. How do we become worthy of it?  And, then, where does it go?  A worldwide crescendo of grief, sustained day after day, and only one tiny note of it is mine.”

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