the next good book

Girlfriend on Mars

By Deborah Willis

8/10
(8/10)

356 pages

What’s it about?

Kevin and Amber have been together since high school- 14 years now.  They run a hydroponic weed business and Kevin is content to tend to the plants and smoke. But, unbeknownst to Kevin,  Amber has decided to move to Mars- for good.  Of course the move to Mars is a long shot.  First she must win a reality TV show that millions are vying for.  Then she actually has to get on the space capsule and leave.  One thing about Amber -she is highly competitive and determined to win this one way trip to a new world.  But what about Kevin? What did it make me think about? How differently the generations see the world.

Should I read it?

I love a novel with a different view and this book is definitely imaginative, humorous, and just different. Plus it is SO NOT from the mind of a baby boomer.  This vision of our planet and its future is definitely from a younger perspective. “Kevin always says that hypocrisy and cognitive dissonance ae the defining features of the modern world: you want to save the planet but there’s no way to visit your family except by car or plane; or you want to be a powerful woman but the only option is to ‘lean in’ and become as sociopathic as the men.  So you feel trapped and hypocritical and guilty.  But you can’t tell anyone, because all your friends on social media seem righteous and outraged and pure.  So you nurture shame, and this shame keeps you from blaming the real culprits, the 1 percent who built this world and who are profiting off your inner turmoil by selling you alcohol or OxyContin or online porn.”  Even with all this angst, Deborah Willis manages to keep this book from taking itself too seriously.  I loved Amber and Kevin.  I was rooting for them the whole way.  I won’t tell you what happens.  Just pick up this book if you are in the mood for something different.

Quote-

“I gave up drinking a few years ago when Amber went booze-free to protest the hypocrisy of a government that allows the legal consumption of the most emotionally, physically, and financially harmful substance in the world- alcohol- but doesn’t let people with cancer smoke a joint to ease their pain.  Her sobriety was kinda like Ghandi’s hunger strike.  And once Amber had gone off the sauce I followed her lead because she became hypersensitive to it; when I drank, she’d say things like, You smell like someone pickled you.  I wonder if Lenin’s body reeks like this.  I just wanted a girlfriend to kiss me, but I don’t know if she ever appreciated my sacrifice. During the era of craft breweries, I gave up booze for her.”

What’s it about?

Kevin and Amber have been together since high school- 14 years now.  They run a hydroponic weed business and Kevin is content to tend to the plants and smoke. But, unbeknownst to Kevin,  Amber has decided to move to Mars- for good.  Of course the move to Mars is a long shot.  First she must win a reality TV show that millions are vying for.  Then she actually has to get on the space capsule and leave.  One thing about Amber -she is highly competitive and determined to win this one way trip to a new world.  But what about Kevin?

What did it make me think about?

How differently the generations see the world.

Should I read it?

I love a novel with a different view and this book is definitely imaginative, humorous, and just different. Plus it is SO NOT from the mind of a baby boomer.  This vision of our planet and its future is definitely from a younger perspective. “Kevin always says that hypocrisy and cognitive dissonance ae the defining features of the modern world: you want to save the planet but there’s no way to visit your family except by car or plane; or you want to be a powerful woman but the only option is to ‘lean in’ and become as sociopathic as the men.  So you feel trapped and hypocritical and guilty.  But you can’t tell anyone, because all your friends on social media seem righteous and outraged and pure.  So you nurture shame, and this shame keeps you from blaming the real culprits, the 1 percent who built this world and who are profiting off your inner turmoil by selling you alcohol or OxyContin or online porn.”  Even with all this angst, Deborah Willis manages to keep this book from taking itself too seriously.  I loved Amber and Kevin.  I was rooting for them the whole way.  I won’t tell you what happens.  Just pick up this book if you are in the mood for something different.

Quote-

“I gave up drinking a few years ago when Amber went booze-free to protest the hypocrisy of a government that allows the legal consumption of the most emotionally, physically, and financially harmful substance in the world- alcohol- but doesn’t let people with cancer smoke a joint to ease their pain.  Her sobriety was kinda like Ghandi’s hunger strike.  And once Amber had gone off the sauce I followed her lead because she became hypersensitive to it; when I drank, she’d say things like, You smell like someone pickled you.  I wonder if Lenin’s body reeks like this.  I just wanted a girlfriend to kiss me, but I don’t know if she ever appreciated my sacrifice. During the era of craft breweries, I gave up booze for her.”

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